Document Detail

Title: RS222-1 - Best Modern Practices for Design in Fast Track Projects
Publication Date: 8/1/2007
Product Type: Research Summary
Status: Supporting Product
Pages: 23
Identifies the best practices from CII research that are the most influential to successful management of design in fast track projects. Details each best practice as it relates to fast track design. Also discusses the most commonly faced challenges in managing design for fast track.
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Abstract

Fast track design-build projects significantly overlap the design phase with the procurement and construction phases. In a fast track project, design becomes the prime mover of project progress because the performance of procurement and construction processes depends on availability of timely and accurate information from the design process.

CII formed the Best Modern Practices for Design in Fast Track Research Team to study this facet of construction. The main objective was to identify best practices that have an impact on the performance of the design phase in fast track projects. Secondary objectives included the identification of correlations between use of CII Best Practices and performance of the design phase in fast track projects, challenges faced in managing the design of fast track projects, and solutions used to mitigate these challenges.

The results indicate that those best practices identified by the research as being most influential to successful management of design (front end planning, change management, constructability, alignment) were also found to have statistically significant positive correlation with the schedule performance of design in fast track projects. The most commonly faced challenges in managing design in fast track projects were identified as:

  1. Lack of adequate front end planning
  2. Inadequate alignment within and across organizations working together in projects.
  3. Scope creep resulting in changes
  4. Getting timely and accurate information from vendors
  5. Coordination and teamwork within the design team and between organizations.
  6. Limited availability of skilled and experienced design work force.